An Urban Pollinator Garden

Berit Erickson dropped by last week to pick up some native plant seeds and talk to me about her demonstration pollinator garden, on a busy corner lot in the west end of Ottawa .

Working in her yard, Berit realized how interested passers-by were in her flowers. Berit herself had noticed how much more lively and inviting to bees, and butterflies and birds her city garden became when she increased the proportion of native plants. Although she had been a skilled gardener for years, the connections between native plants and wildlife had not been part of her garden lore.

What Berit saw happening in her garden, and happening relatively quickly, changed her whole approach to gardening. Berit writes, “I’m not exaggerating when I say that creating this pollinator garden was one of the best decisions I ever made and that it has changed my life.” She wanted to share her newfound understanding. She labelled the plants visible from the sidewalk, and created, printed, and set out a pamphlet “Create Your Own Pollinator Garden: you can make a difference.” More than 150 pamphlets have been picked up by passers-by. You can read more about her garden, and gain valuable practical pointers on creating your own pollinator garden, on her blog: cornerpollinatorgarden.net.

vergerette à feuilles segmentées

Spring Visit to Alpine Garden, MBG

Remembering a visit to the Montreal Botanical Garden, May, 2018.

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Beaux Arbres will have Shooting Star (Dodecatheon) for sale in the spring.
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Rock Whitlow-grass at the Montreal Botanical Garden
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Eastern Wild Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis)

The Alpine Garden at MBG is divided into areas planted with species from different regions of the world. I was delighted to discover that there was an eastern North America section and that it was planted with many of the species I have been promoting for rock gardens.

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Prairie Smoke (Geum triflorum) at the Montreal Botanical Garden.

Beaux Arbres has offered Prairie Smoke for several years and it is always a popular choice.

A wonderfully showy flower in the South American section, Sisyrinchium striatum or Pale Yellow-eyed Grass is related to our native Blue-eyed Grasses. I was amazed to find this plant from Chile and Argentina growing in Montreal (Zone 5B)l. I started a flat of this species from seed — easy to do — and we’ll see how it does in our Zone 4B garden.

Pale Yellow-eyed Grass in the Montreal Botanical Garden.